Report finds most cities in B.C. happy with their skateparks

The Rossland Skatepark Association (RSA) has just released a report researched and written by Les Carter in which he interviewed key individuals — typically planners or directors — from 40 communities operating skateparks in B.C.

The Rossland Skatepark Association (RSA) has just released a report researched and written by Les Carter in which he interviewed key individuals — typically planners or directors — from 40 communities operating skateparks in B.C.

Carter and the RSA urge everyone with an interest to read and consider this wealth of skatepark experiences before the public meeting on May 10 to begin the process of site selection.

“At the first public meeting I facilitated about a skatepark in Rossland [in January], the participants agreed that a survey of other communities would be useful to find out how they created their skateparks and how they turned out,” Carter said.

The survey and report consider issues such as neighbourhood impacts, maintenance and so forth.

Other communties’ experiences suggest, Carter writes, that the skatepark should be placed “front and centre in the community … to recognize the legitimate desire of young people to gather and recreate in a place that does not marginalize them.”

Similarly, the park should be accessible to “the largest number of potential users.”

Communities found a distance of 100 meters to residences is sufficient to make noise levels manageable, that most communities (36 out of 40) have had no difficulties of any kind caused by their skatepark, and that long term viability depends on a community institution committed to looking after the park and “re-engaging young people as the population changes.”

Carter also writes that communities found “a poor process leads to the wrong park in the wrong place.”

The full report can be downloaded from the RSA’s website: www.skaterossland.ca.

The RSA’s public consultation process continues on May 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the Miners’ Hall.