Natural nationalism

Canada Day celebrations usually strike a relatively subdued tone compared to the over-the-top patriotism (some might say jingoism) that’s regularly on display at Fourth of July celebrations throughout the United States. But that doesn’t make the annual festivities north of the border any less sincere.

Canada Day celebrations usually strike a relatively subdued tone compared to the over-the-top patriotism (some might say jingoism) that’s regularly on display at Fourth of July celebrations throughout the United States. But that doesn’t make the annual festivities north of the border any less sincere.

While perhaps less flashy, the essential sentiment behind the events held across Canada on July 1 is the same as that which is so blatantly showcased at events across the U.S. on July 4. It’s all about loving about your country.

There are, of course, many different things to love about a country such as Canada (and many things to be upset about as well, but we’ll leave talk of that to the other 364 days of the year.) One thing in particular which stood out during celebrations in this part of the country, however, is the love of our beautiful, majestic, natural surroundings.

All across the region, Canada Day celebrations took advantage of what the local environment has to offer.

In Castlegar, residents basked in the warm West Kootenay sun at Kinsmen Park and later, once the sun had set behind the mountain peaks which frame the city, enjoyed an outdoor film screening at the Complex.

In Nelson, people flocked to the sandy shores at the Lakeside Park beach for the annual Canada Day sand castle building competition.

And in Rossland, about 200 people took part in the annual Mount Roberts hike. After ascending 800 metres the group helped hang a massive Canadian flag at the mountain’s peak, which can now be seen from the city’s downtown and as far away as the United States.

Forget the fireworks. These displays of patriotism feel far more fitting for Canadians who live and thrive in this relatively remote but intrinsically wonderful part of the country.

 

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