A penny no more

At long last, the government has done something to get rid of that old relic from the past: the penny.

At long last, the government has done something to get rid of that old relic from the past: the penny. The archaic coin has become increasingly useless over the years. In this day and age the only uses for the coins, which are often dirty and found in trashy back alleys, is as a means to transport contagion. Is that a good use? To allow microscopic parasites a method of transportation? We are paying 1.6 cents for every penny that’s made. Where does that “.6” cents go, but in a cloud of smoke in the air.

Picture the scenario. You go into a shop to buy something and find that oh, you don’t have a penny, well, everywhere you go there is a jar to take a penny or leave a penny. If you’re short take one, two or three, if you have some extra, throw them in this jar.

The States has it much rougher. There, it takes a startling 2.4 cents to press a penny. While I’m sure there are a lot of people that would like get rid of a monetary currency that is worth more in raw material than it is in money, there are a lot of supporters for the penny in the States. For instance Abraham Lincoln is a well respected president and would lose his status of being on two denominations, the other being the five dollar bill.

We have no such issue here in Canada, after all, the Queen of England is on not just the penny, but all of our coins. I’m sure her highness could rest more soundly if she knew for a fact that her likeness was not being thrown around like leftover Halloween candy.

The only case that we see for the penny, is the prospect that charities that rely on penny jar donations will see a loss. But if that happens there is something that will take its place, and that’s the next coin that has no real buying power: the nickel.

Just Posted

Josie Hotel will be ready on opening day, says management

West Kootenay’s first ski-in, ski-out boutique hotel to open this month

Castlegar’s Waterline property purchased; owners to protect it for rock climbers

New owners plan to subdivide, sell bluffs to recreational climbing group

Rossland council’s first meeting sets appointments

Councillors assigned to sit on boards, committees on major city issues

Feds, B.C. to expand Darkwoods Conservation area

New funding allows the national land trust to add some 7,900 hectares to the Darkwoods Conservation Area

Good fencing makes good neighbours— especially when your neighbours are bears

Workshop in Pass Creek this weekend to promote benefits of proper protection for livestock

Education, training a big part of trade fair

Exhibitors are seeing a lot of interest in education, training or skills upgrading at the Black Press Extreme Education and Career Fair

2 B.C. men charged after allegedly stealing $1,400 worth of butter

The two men, ages 23 and 25, are facing charges of theft under $5,000, Coquitlam police said

Invasive fire ants join the tourist swarms at Hawaii Volcano National Park

Invasive species found at popular tourist destination

Ten-year sentence for man convicted of B.C. belt-strangling death

Shayne McGenn guilty of manslaughter in 2016 death of David Delaney, 63

Roy Clark, country singer, ‘Hee Haw’ star, has died

Guitar virtuoso died because of complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Okla. He was 85.

Lack of funding, culture on campus biggest barriers for Indigenous students: report

Report based on nearly 300 responses found lack of support at post-secondary schools a big concern

Tinder sex assault suspect charged; additional alleged victims sought

Vincent Noseworthy of Alberta is accused of aggravated sexual assault, unlawful confinement and more

Drug-related deaths double for B.C. youth in care, advocate says

Teens say positive connections with adults key to recovery

Children’s strawberry-flavoured medicines recalled due to faulty safety cap

Three different acetaminophen syrups part of nationwide recall

Most Read