Jubilee Park in downtown Trail on Aug. 19 overlooking the Columbia River. (Sheri Regnier photo)

Trust invites feedback on strategic plan draft

Columbia Basin Trust asks for feedback from residents to help guide future activities

It’s important for everyone living in the Columbia Basin to weigh-in on what they see as priorities for legacy funding over the next few years.

That’s why Columbia Basin Trust (Trust) is asking locals to have a look at a draft of its strategic plan, now available online, and leave a comment or two sharing your viewpoint.

The document is available to read via the Trust’s website at OurTrust.org. On the home page click on “The Trust Invites Feedback on Draft Strategic Plan” to connect with the respective link.

A hard copy of the six-page draft plan is available for anyone who does not have access to the internet.

Call the Trust toll-free at 1.800.505.8998 to request a hard copy of the document, then either share feedback directly in conversation with Trust staff or in writing to the Trust.

This opportunity is only open until Sept. 11 at 4:30 p.m.

In short, the priorities in alphabetical order include: Ecosystem Restoration; High-speed Connectivity; Housing; Local Food Production, Processing and Distribution; Support for Business Renewal; and Supporting Communities.

“Like so many others, we have adapted our approach to engagement and to planning in response to COVID-19,” said Johnny Strilaeff, Trust president and chief executive officer.

“We appreciate that people took the time to speak with us over the summer and tell us what matters in their communities. I hope all Basin residents now do the same and give us their feedback on how the Trust can support their aspirations.”

Since June 2020, the Trust has been engaging with a variety of stakeholders in the Basin to develop a short-term strategic plan to guide its activities over the next 18 to 24 months.

Previous: Trust postpones public meetings in Trail and Salmo

Previous: Trust postpones all 2020 public engagements

The Trust directly spoke with its volunteer boards and advisory committees, local government leaders, and individuals engaged in a range of sectors including business and industry, education, environment, social services, arts, culture and heritage, and youth development.

These conversations identified challenges and opportunities in Basin communities, and that input was the basis for developing the draft plan. The Trust is also continuing meetings with Basin First Nations communities and will incorporate this feedback into the plan prior to finalizing.

“This is the Trust’s 25th year,” Strilaeff said. “And public input is as fundamental to the Trust now as it was in 1995.”

After this round of public feedback is integrated into the draft plan, the Trust directors will review the document at their September board meeting, with an aim of sharing the final approved plan in late September.

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