The city is working on a Wayfinding Signage Project this summer to direct visitors into downtown Trail attractions and businesses. (Sheri Regnier photo)

Signs needed to draw in Silver City sightseers

Council is working on a plan to give tourists a heads up on new attractions like the Trail museum

Where are the signs?

With multi-million dollar attractions on the south end of town – the Columbia River Skywalk and the Trail Riverfront Centre – visibly missing throughout the city are signs – of any kind – to draw tourists in.

The Trail Times asked Mayor Mike Martin if council has a plan to put up some signage this summer so visitors know there are interesting new landmarks located off the main drag.

He says a “very exciting project is underway.”

“Council is well aware of the need for improved wayfinding in the downtown area,” Martin explained. “And, as such, have commenced work on a plan that will make for some very attractive opportunities to provide direction to downtown civic structures as well as provide private businesses an opportunity to participate.”

The city’s engineering and communication departments are currently working on a Wayfinding Signage Project.

“The goal is to provide motorists and pedestrians clear direction to Trail’s downtown civic structures,” said Martin. “And participating businesses, by way of purchasing a ‘blade sign’ from the main corridor and downtown.”

(A blade sign is a type of projecting sign mounted on a building facade or storefront pole or attached to a surface perpendicular to the normal flow of traffic. These signs are said to be one of the most effective ways of attracting foot traffic toward establishments.)

The project involves attaching wayfinding blade signs to existing infrastructure, such as the red gateway features at the corners of Victoria Street and Pine, Cedar and Bay avenues.

“An aesthetically complementary support structure will be fastened to the minor gateway features,” Martin explained. “And the support structure will hold the sign blades. One blade style, to be fastened on the highway side of the minor gateways, will be designated for civic structures.”

The other blade style, to be fastened to the downtown side of the minor gateway feature, will be available for purchase for participating downtown businesses.

“The city is currently working with external consultants on the final design, structural engineering approval, and necessary permits,” Martin said.

“Once the final design has been approved by all parties, the city will be able to identify costing per-unit and then will be able to approach businesses to participate.”

Information forms will be distributed that explain the program, contain full colour renderings, purchasing terms, costing and other pertinent information.

Martin says the forms are expected to be ready for distribution by mid-summer.

Budget depending, the project could expand upon 2018’s scope in two ways.

First, a minor gateway feature (match to the red posts along Victoria Street) may be installed in East Trail at Second Avenue and Bailey Street along with corresponding blade signs.

Secondly, smaller directional signs and other features, such as vinyl maps adhered to streetscape like waste receptacles, may be developed within the downtown core and East Trail business centre.

Below are simply examples of blade signs, these signs are not part of the project underway in Trail:

 

Examples of blade signs.

Examples of blade signs.

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