Seven Summits student Cooper Baley (left) with his family hiking in his home town of Rossland. With Free Fridays they won’t have to limit family time to the weekends. Submitted photo

Rossland’s Seven Summits Learning Centre adopts four-day week

Students will study Monday-Thursday for eight hours

Fridays are going to get a little sweeter for students at the Seven Summits Centre for Learning.

After testing out the Free Friday concept over the last academic year and challenging the notion of a five-day study week, the school is beefing up the perks for staff and students by modifying its week into four longer days.

Starting this September, the new hours will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday to Thursday.

Designed to give students more study hours than they had before, the new arrangement is expected to deliver a positive impact on student performance, inspire meaningful learning and boost academic achievement even further. Class work, labs and assignments will be completed in four days to the same, if not higher, standards than they currently are in five, the school said.

However, the Free Friday will also give students the option to boost their future career prospects by exploring the world of work and volunteering. It will allow all to catch up on homework, benefit from extra study at home, and enjoy more quality family time or to play, rest and pursue a healthy, active, balanced lifestyle. It will also provide more time for athletes to travel and train.

“Gaining traction in the corporate world, the four-day week will become another significant differentiating factor that enables our students to get so much more out of their high school education,” says Ann Quarterman, operations manager at Seven Summits Centre for Learning.

Providing an exceptional alternative to a big high school education, Seven Summits Centre for Learning is adding Free Fridays to an expanding set of unique selling propositions which set its blended learning model, delivered by SD71’s Navigate NIDES program, apart from the competition.

These include small classes, low staff/student ratios, accelerated learning, foreign exchanges, a wide choice of core and elective subjects, excellent post-secondary preparation, independence, self-directed study and the kind of custom education options you’d expect from a private school, without their expensive fees.

“Having Fridays off through the school year is one of the best ideas and makes Seven Summits even better for local families and their children’s personal growth,” says Deke Baley, whose son Cooper is in Grade 10 at Seven Summits. “It will allow him, and us of course, to have some extra fun while still staying on schedule with schoolwork. With the awesome structure at 7S, our kids are guaranteed a top-notch education, while still realizing that life is also about fun and keeping it real.”

Seven Summits Centre for Learning was established by the community, for the community, six years ago to provide greater educational choice in the region. Following the B.C. Ministry of Education’s 21st century learning model and supported by fully certified B.C. teachers, it has built a solid reputation for delivering personalized, creative, and forward-thinking high school education for students in Grades 8 to 12.

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