Rossland Summit School grade one students went on an outdoor field trip as part of Wildsight’s Winter Wonder program.

Rossland youth experience the wonders of winter

Rossland youth experience the wonders of winter. Rossland Summit School (RSS) primary students experience a half day field trip.

Rossland Summit School primary students in kindergarten through Grade 3 experienced a half-day field trip in the outdoors to learn about the winter season delivered by Wildsight as part of the BC school curriculum.

Wildsight’s Winter Wonder program connects students with the joys, secrets and marvels of our Kootenay winters. During a half-day field trip, they explored winter wildlife, snow science and weather.

Professional Wildsight environmental educator Jess Williams dressed as Frosty Flake — a snowflake — for the program she has been delivering at the school.

Williams describes the program as a “reminder to students that there is more to winter than just snow and cold temperatures.

During the field trip, students learn about wildlife and how they cope during winter, how snowflakes are born and how trees and plants prepare for winter. The students learn all of this while playing awesome games and doing fun activities outside. It’s a really great program.”

The Grade 1 class experienced how animals adapt in the winter. Students looked for animal tracks in the snow and they received booklets showing animal tracks of various animals.

They learned about where animals live, whether the animals make physical adaptations such as camouflaging themselves in the winter, how they hunt for prey, change routine, if they hibernate, migrate, or stay put. Students then looked for mouse houses in the snow.

Students also conducted a snow study with a magnifying glass, studying the snow formations and different types of snow crystals.

“I have learned how to use a magnifying glass and how to move it to look at snowflakes. I am enjoying learning about the snowflakes,” said Grade 1 student Hyde.

“Across Canada, kids are spending less and less time outside, creating what some refer to as a ‘nature deficit,’” said Monica Nissen, Wildsight’s Education in the Wild program manager.

Winter Wonder gets them out there, connecting them with the winter ecology in their own backyards,” Nissen explains.

“Research shows that outdoor play during the winter actually builds the immune system, stimulates the imagination and promotes problem solving. Kids who bundle up properly and play outside in the winter are generally happier and healthier.”

Almost 4,000 students throughout the Columbia Basin will experience the magic of winter ecology through these Wildsight programs. With nearly 160 field trips booked so far, this year is shaping up to reach the most students yet.

These field trips have been made possible due to the financial support of the Columbia Basin Trust, Fortis BC, TD Friends of the Environment Foundation, the North Face Explore Fund and the BC Gaming Commission.

 

Just Posted

Rossland’s Joe Hill Coffee House rings in the season

Show on Sunday, Dec. 16, features some new voices and some old, helping spread Yuletide cheer.

Rossland elementary students learn about business, community

Students’ efforts raises money for Giving Cupboard

Snowstorm called for the Kootenays

FortisBC advises electric customers to prepare for storm-related outages

Rosssland ski bus returns this year — with a fee

Company to offer service from downtown to RED Mountain 12 hours a day

Rossland meeting targets for sustainability, report says

Report card gives city high marks in most areas of sustainable development

Trudeau to make it harder for future PM to reverse Senate reforms

Of the 105 current senators, 54 are now independents who have banded together in Independent Senators’ Group

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

B.C. fire chief pleads with Ottawa for traumatic stress support

Campbell River fire chief Thomas Doherty presented concerns to federal government

21 detained before Paris protests as police deploy in force

There was a strong police presence outside the central Saint Lazare train station, where police in riot gear checked bags

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

Most Read