Rossland Library outlines importance of literacy in the community

The Rossland Public Library is hoping for an increase in funding from the City to help them do more in the community.

The Rossland Public Library is hoping for an increase in funding from the City, which they said could help them to do even more for the community.

Katie Albright: from the Rossland Public Library led a delegation of Library Board members in council on Dec. 10.

Albright, the library director,  detailed the many innovations the library is pursuing in the community as well as outlining a few of the things that it hopes to expand on.

Albright said the library acts as the information centre of the community and has served Rossland since 1959, beginning with a modest 250 books.

“We’ve expanded over the years and now satisfy the needs of the community,” Albright said, adding that they provide many economic benefits to Rossland.

She noted three main categories that the library focuses on.

The first, providing services to local residents and facilitating literacy as an economic development vision; the second, supporting local businesses and self-employment visuals; and third, providing incentives for future investments and migration into the community.

In 2011, 52 per cent of elible residents have an active library card, which is 10 per cent higher than B.C.’s average.

An example of the services she gave the need to foster 21st century literary skills, from early childhood to lifelong learning, which pays long term dividends. A study showed that every dollar invested in early childhood education yields $7 in long-term education.

“Kids who do not read in the summer lose 6-8 weeks of what they learned in the previous school year, and by the end of the fifth grade students who do not read during the summer were behind their peers an average of two years,” she said. “We have a summer reading club offered through the library. It’s a provincially designed program aimed at encouraging reading through the school break. this year we had 102 children signed up to the program.”

The city will decide on the funding during budget time later in the year.

Just Posted

‘If we do nothing, the herd will certainly be extirpated’: Caribou maternity pen proposed in Nakusp

The Arrow Lakes Caribou Society is waiting for a response from the province

Kalesnikoff CFO recognized as lumber industry leader

Krystle Seed recognized as one of the top ten people under 40 in the lumber industry.

Cops make fentanyl bust in Castlegar

Over 280 pills among drugs seized

Rossland introduces new traffic bylaw

Right now it costs more money to write a ticket than the city gets from the fine, says a councillor

Federal candidates debate environmental issues in Castlegar

Few sparks and much agreement between candidates that action is needed

VIDEO: Langley woman’s security camera records its own theft

Langley family discovers early morning grab was recorded

Share crash data, private insurers tell David Eby, ICBC

B.C. monopoly makes drivers retrieve their own records

B.C. VIEWS: Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou

B.C.’s largest herds turn the corner from extinction

Pearson nets shootout winner as Canucks clip Flyers 3-2

Vancouver picks up second straight home win

Map on Elections Canada website sends Nanaimo-Ladysmith voters to landfill

Address for polling station correct, but Google Map address differs

BC Children’s Hospital launches 2 new virtual care sites bringing total to 19 across province

Provincial initiative allows pediatric patients to see health specialists through video

‘Wham-bam out the door’: Surrey man’s front yard left ruined by scamming landscaper

Resident warns neighbours to be careful of door-to-door salesmen

PHOTOS: Kipchoge becomes first runner to dip under 2 hours for marathon

Olympic champion and world record holder from Kenya clocks 1 hour, 59 minutes and 40 seconds

Most Read