Real Foods Seedy Saturday

Get real about your food, health and your community at this weekend’s Rossland Real Foods’ Seedy Saturday.

Get along to Seedy Saturday this Feb. 28 at Rossland Miner’s Hall and learn more than you imagined about gardening and eating real foods.

Get along to Seedy Saturday this Feb. 28 at Rossland Miner’s Hall and learn more than you imagined about gardening and eating real foods.

Alicia Wallace

Rossland News

Get real about your food, your health and your community at this weekend’s Rossland Real Foods’ Seedy Saturday, the one stop seed starting stand. Hosted by Rossland Real Foods this is an opportunity to purchase and or trade organic, non-genetically modified (GMO) seeds as well as learn about companion planting, gardening ergonomics and a range of other gardening tips.

The event will be held at the Miners’ Hall on Columbia Ave. from 1-4 p.m. this Saturday. Entry to the event is free and so is the advice that will be given by local seasoned gardeners. These gardeners know what works best in Rossland and the surrounding region and are full of knowledge to have you harvesting your own crops this summer.

“At Seedy Saturday new gardeners can speak with experienced gardeners and learn what types of vegetables grow well in Rossland,” said Rossland Real Foods volunteer, Raychel Roussin.

The seed swap is important for cultivating crops that grow well in Rossland, producing the best yield possible for the specific conditions typical to the region.

“Locally adapted seeds are better adapted to living in our mountain climate,” said Real Foods volunteer, Anne Damude.

It’s not just the seeds that are for sale. 2015 is the International Year of Soil and to celebrate, Earthy Organics will have sea soil, seed starting mix, seed trays and reemay garden blankets available to purchase.

Local bee keeper Joe Buy, will be on hand to provide advice on raising bees and can give tips on open pollination for plants. Shoppers can select from around eight different retail non-GMO, open pollinated and organic seed producers and the countless seed traders. You will be able to collect your own seeds in the fall from the plants you raise from these seeds.

Local occupational therapist and structural integration practitioner Sarah Taylor will be making a presentation titled “Ergonomics for Harmonious Gardening” 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. The presentation will focus on gardening activities, body positioning and environmental awareness. This workshop will actively explore standing, walking, kneeling, bending, lifting, carrying, pushing, pulling and using general gardening tools. No registration is required — just show up if you would like to participate.

The seed swap, where locals can trade seeds, is a growing part of Rossland’s Seedy Saturday event.

“Gardeners who saved open pollinated seed from their vegetables or flowers are invited to bring their extra seeds and trade with other gardeners.” explains Damude. “At Seedy Saturday, we’ll have a special table for seed swaps.”

Seed swappers are asked to package their seeds in small envelopes that are clearly labeled with the type of seed and date of collection. Each envelope should have enough seed to plant a five foot row, or start three to five individual plants. Details on seed swapping including how to package seeds can be found on the Rossland Real Foods website www.rosslandfood.com.

 

Rossland Real Foods is planning a seed saving workshop this summer so you can learn how to save your non-GMO organic seeds for next season’s sow. The organization is also planning a chicken crawl where residents can view other residents’ chicken coops and get great advice. For more information on Seedy Saturday visit Rossland Real Foods website as listed above.