Privacy watchdogs say B.C.-based firm broke rules for political ads on Facebook

AggregateIQ provides election-related software and political advertising

An investigation by two Canadian privacy commissioners found that a Victoria-based firm broke privacy laws when it used and disclosed personal information in the province, the United States and the United Kingdom.

A joint report by the federal and B.C. privacy commissioners says AggregateIQ failed to ensure appropriate consent for its use and disclosure of the personal information of voters.

AggregateIQ provides election-related software and political advertising.

It has been linked to Cambridge Analytica, a now bankrupt company accused of improperly helping to crunch data for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in the United States.

Federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien and B.C. commissioner Michael McEvoy found the company leveraged a Facebook audience feature that allowed advertisers to target certain users for political advertising.

READ MORE: B.C., federal privacy watchdogs to probe possible privacy breaches at Aggregate IQ, Facebook

Their joint report says AggregateIQ did not appropriately verify consent and individuals wouldn’t have expected their personal information to be disclosed to Facebook or that it would have been used for the purpose of political advertising.

The commissioners recommend, and AggregateIQ agreed, to implement measures to ensure it obtains valid consent in the future and that it delete all personal information that is no longer needed for legal or business purposes.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Nelson skateboarders charged with assaulting Trail police officer

Incident happened at the skate park in Trail

Flooding: Why the RDCK ordered hundreds of properties evacuated

All evacuation orders have now been rescinded

City of Rossland introduces new fees for some permits and services

City adopted bylaw to introduce the fees on June 1

‘Not technically feasible’: Grand Forks volunteers stack sandbags to fill in damaged dike

Residents hoped governments would do emergency repairs, but learned Sunday that it was up to them

Boundary freshet 2020: At least 189 properties ordered to evacuate as of June 1

Real-time gauges on the West Kettle, Kettle and Granby rivers suggested Monday water near peak

B.C. records four new COVID-19 cases, Abbotsford hospital outbreak cleared

Four senior home outbreaks also declared over, eight still active

RCMP, coroner investigate murder-suicide on Salt Spring Island

Two dead, police say there is no risk to the public

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

B.C.’s Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics goes virtual

The annual event partnering RCMP with Special Olympians is dramatically altered by COVID-19

Bateman program encourages people to sketch outside, connect with nature

#MyNatureSketch initiative encourages Canadians to become ‘bright-eyed three year olds’

Be cautious expanding COVID-19 bubble, Dr. Bonnie Henry tells B.C.

Senior homes stay off-limits as schools, businesses reopen

Most Read