Last week for the Rossland Mountain Market

This week is the last chance to get out and sample the wonderful assortment of produce, baking, coffee and crafts at the market.

Michel Germain stands in front of his artisan baked goods from Golden City Bakery at last week's Rossland Mountain Market. Thursday

This week is the last chance to get out and sample the wonderful assortment of produce, baking, coffee and crafts that are available every week at the Rossland Mountain Market. In fact today is the market’s last day. Starting at 3 p.m. David Hartman and his band will be playing, while shoppers and those who just want to get one last taste of the community market atmosphere browse and chat with their neighbour.

Rachael Roussin, from Rossland Real Food, said that this year the market has seen a rise of local vendors, which she said was exciting.

For example two additional vendors this year were Mountain Nugget Chocolate Company selling homemade ice cream sandwiches and Gypsy at Red selling dips, hummus and homemade treats.

Roussin encouraged everyone to come out.

“We’ll have all the vendors,” she said. “Everyone has to come and say goodbye to all their favourite vendors.

“Right now, the market is a little slower, we have fewer vendors, but everyone’s favourites are here.”

Those include Natalie’s fresh produce, Rossland Mountain Roasting Coffee company, Alpine Grind fresh baguettes, Earthy Organics with fresh organic produce and Sweet Dreams Cakery’s cupcakes.

“I hope that everybody is keen to come back next year, when we’ll be back downtown, “ Roussin said. “This location by the firehall was only temporary because of the construction. We’re excited, because of the downtown revitalization, it’s going to be an even better atmosphere for the farmer’s market so we’re hoping that it attracts people from the area to come and also inspires local people to sell their wares.”

At the beginning of the season, they did have vendors come from as far as Nelson, but the market hasn’t quite become busy enough to keep them coming back.

Roussin said they try to keep the market as local as possible.

“It really works best on the local level and we survive best on support from locals and we hope to see more of that next year,” she said, adding: “The weather’s been so nice and it’s  been a really nice opportunity to say hi to your neighbours.”

Shaun Taylor has been roasting up artisan coffee for the past eight years and selling it as Rossland Roasting Coffee Company at the market for the past two.

He said that since the coffee roasting is just a part time hobby for him, it’s really the community that keeps him coming back.

“If it wasn’t for the fact that the community that drops by is so upbeat on supporting the market buying organic produce and shopping locally, then I probably wouldn’t be here,” Taylor said. “I’m really more here for the social aspect of it. I’ve got locals from the community who I’d feel like I’m letting them down if I didn’t show up. It’s something that I look forward to every week, just seeing the same happy faces.”

It’s also helped this year that the weather has been co-operating, which keeps spirits of vendors and shoppers up. He said that everyone who comes to buy things at the market are positive, since they are buying local fresh produce and baked goods.

“By the time they show up at my stand they are very upbeat,” he said. “It really makes it a pleasant experience for everyone. Overall I think the market has done quite well this year as compared to last year, given that the location shifted because of the construction downtown. I don’t think there was a very big or negative impact, but I’m looking forward to it moving back to its original location, just so you get more walk by, more exposure and hopefully bring in some new faces that wouldn’t want to walk up the hill just to see if things are going on.”

Tailor also noted that the market is a good way for newcomers to the town or the region to get a good feel for the Rossland vibe.

 

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