Human remains found in California park ID’d as Canadian man

Officials said in December that there was no initial signs of foul play

Skeletal remains found last month in Southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park were identified as a 51-year-old Canadian man, officials said.

The bones were spotted during an analysis of photos taken in a remote section of the park last summer. The National Park Service was alerted, and rangers hiked to the area, which is rocky and away from trails, on Dec. 20. There they found human remains and personal belongings, but no ID.

The remains were identified this week by the San Bernardino County Coroner’s Office as Paul Miller of Ontario, Canada, the park service said on Twitter.

Miller was last seen leaving his hotel room on July 13, 2018 to hike Fortynine Palms Oasis, according to park service. Authorities and volunteers searched for Miller months.

Officials said in December that there was no initial signs of foul play.

The Associated Press

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