From left: Michelle Mungall, Anne Kang and Bruce Ralston. (B.C. Government photos)

Horgan unveils B.C. cabinet shuffle changes

Premier John Horgan has made three major changes to his cabinet

Premier John Horgan has unveiled three changes in a cabinet shuffle.

Bruce Ralston, MLA for Surrey-Whalley, has been appointed as Energy Minister, swapping ministerial roles with Michelle Mungall who will take over as Minister of Jobs, Economic Development and Competitiveness.

Ralston’s focus will be to implement CleanBC initiatives, as well as overseeing BC Hydro. He will continue to serve as lead minister for consular affairs, as well.

Mungall, who represents the Nelson-Creston riding, will be responsible for trade with a focus on B.C.’s tech sector.

Anne Kang, MLA for Burnaby-Deer Lake, will take on the role of Minister of Citizen’s Services, freeing up Selina Robinson to continue solely as Housing Minister.

Robinson took on the position after Surrey-Panorama MLA Jinny Sims resigned from cabinet in October due to an ongoing RCMP investigation into accusations that have not been publicly disclosed.

READ MORE: Surrey NDP MLA calls Liberal flyer about RCMP investigating her ‘unfortunate’

Kang’s focus will include connecting rural, remote and Indigenous communities with high-speed internet and modernizing government procurement to better allow smaller companies to do business with the province.

“These ministers will work hard every day to deliver sustainable economic growth that provides good jobs, a better quality of life and a stronger province for people in every region,” Horgan said in a statement. “I am confident they will put their knowledge and energy to work for people, as we focus on building an economy that works for everyone.”


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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