Miss White of the Earth Rangers holds up a Harris Hawk for the Grade 6 Drama class of Rossland School to examine.

Fur and feather fiesta

A Rossland School assembly to host the Earth Rangers took over 100 children on a wild ride about the importance of protecting animals.

Rossland School went wild Monday morning.

A school assembly to host the Earth Rangers took over 100 children on a wild ride about the importance of protecting animals and preserving the wild space they need in order to survive.

Earth Rangers—a kids’ conservation organization dedicated to educating children about biodiversity—tried to get them to become directly involved in protecting animals and their habitats.

“We want them to become active with wildlife,” said animal trainer Meghan Woodworth.

The Earth Rangers featured live animal ambassadors—the European barn owl, pine marten, tegu (large lizard) and the Harris hawk—demonstrating their natural behaviours.

Children were exposed to the silent flight of the barn owl, being asked to close their eyes at one point as the bird was set free, to see if they could hear the bird.

They saw the darting, leaping ability of the martin, the flight of the hawk, and the power of the tegu.

Kids are encouraged to take action through the Bring Back the Wild Program, said Woodworth.

Bring Back the Wild is an education and fundraising program that educates children about the importance of protecting animals by preserving their natural habitats, while raising funds to support research and the acquisition and restoration of endangered habitats across Canada.

Since launching the program in September 2010, over 200,000 kids have registered for a Bring Back the Wild campaign raising $1 million for conservation.

The tour focused on four Canadian species with populations in decline: the Western bumble bee; beluga whale; barn swallow; and Blanding’s turtle.

Earth Rangers will visit 550 schools this school year.