Electric fencing can keep bears away from chickens and fruit

Rossland Real Food and Bear Aware put on a workshop about electric fencing to keep out predators last week.

Joanne Siderius

Rossland Real Food and Bear Aware put on a workshop about electric fencing to keep out predators last week.

The simple electric fence set up could be used to stop bears and other animals from reaching not-quite-ripe fruit trees and chicken coups.

While turnout for event on Wednesday was on the low side, there were a few interested onlookers.

Joanne Siderius, Nelson and Area E and F Bear Aware Co-ordinator made the trip to demonstrate how to erect a temporary or long-term fence to keep predators out.

Siderius first drove rebar stakes into the ground to make the perimeter that would become the fenceposts. She then attached clips to the posts that hold the wires.

The wires then are wrapped around the perimeter, hooked up to a electric charger machine and grounds.

Siderius had two chargers on display, one needed to be plugged in and kept out of the rain, and the other was solar powered and could be left out.

The chargers cost a few hundred dollars and are by far the biggest cost.

The fences, when grounded are relatively safe to touch as well, provided the person touching it has rubber soles on their shoes.

Sharon Wieder, from Rossland Bear Aware said the fences could help a lot of people see their fruit ripen, rather than being eaten by a bear before that time.

It can also be a proactive way to keep chickens safe, as hungry bears may break into a coup primarily to eat the feed, then stay for the chickens.

A zap under the fur would make that a negative experience and could help keep bears off of properties and out of town.

For more info on the fences go to www.bearaware.bc.ca.

 

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