Coyotes kill dog, chase cyclist in Fraser Valley; B.C. conservation officers issue warning

BC Conservation Officer Service urging people to secure garbage and other attractants

A dog has been killed and at least three other pets injured by coyotes in the Fraser Valley recently, prompting a warning from the B.C. Conservation Officer Service.

“There has also been several reports of aggressive encounters with coyotes in highly-populated areas, which is not normal behaviour and a public safety risk,” the agency said in a statement Friday.

A small dog was recently killed by a coyote after its owner let it out on their property, the service said. BC COS didn’t go into any further detail of the incident.

This week, however, another small dog was snatched by a coyote after its owner let it out in the yard. The owner managed to pull her dog back inside and rushed it to a local vet. The dog is expected to survive, the agency said.

In another instance, last week, a coyote grabbed a cat and another was seen growling and chasing a cyclist.

“Several recent reports have also surfaced of people encountering coyotes, especially while out walking their dogs,” the agency added.

The Lower Mainland is home to an estimated 2,000 to 3,000 urban coyotes, which moved into the area in the 1980s, according to the BC SPCA. The province does not publicly track coyote conflicts as it does bears and cougars.

Conservation officers suspect that while coyotes may be acting more aggressively because they typically begin looking for a mate around this time of year, it is not normal behaviour for coyotes to attack or chase people – especially larger people, like adults – and is likely due to the animals becoming food conditioned.

ALSO READ: Okanagan man, Yorkshire terrier chased by coyote

“Like other wildlife, coyotes can also be lured into communities due to unsecure attractants such as garbage, pet food and bird seed,” the agency said. “Securing attractants around your home is the best way to prevent human-wildlife conflicts from happening in the first place.”

The Conservation Officer Service is reminding people to discourage coyote conflict by:

  • Picking up after your dog and keeping dogs on a leash.
  • Not feeding pets outside. If needed, cleaning up any pet food immediately after feeding.
  • Not leaving any small pets out unattended for long periods of time, particularly at night.

If a coyote is in the area it is recommend to keep children inside until the animal has left the area, or to pick children up and carry them.

If a person encounters a coyote behaving aggressively to them, BC COS recommends the person make them self appear large, make lots of noise and don’t turn your back on the animal. The person should also use stones or sticks and wave their arms aggressively while maintaining eye contact. If children are in the vicinity they should be picked up and the adult should slowly back away.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

AnimalsConservation

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

New city hall, four-storey development proposed for Rossland

The building would include 37 affordable housing units

Deadline approaching for Rossland Museum and Discovery Centre request for proposals

Applicants have until April 10 to submit their proposals for the project

Castlegar hospice director says COVID-19 measures make serving the dying heartbreaking

Social distancing brings big challenges to offering support

Slocan Valley craft distiller wading through obstacles to help fight COVID-19

From raw materials to licences to bottles, getting production ramped up has been a challenge

Rossland Public Library changes delivery service model due to COVID-19 pandemic

The library physically shut down on March 17, but online services always available.

From inside the ER: B.C. doctor tells it like it is from the frontlines of COVID-19

‘Stay home. It’s working,’ says ER doctor in a Q&A discussion, ‘And please don’t worry.’

Don’t stop going to the doctor, just do it virtually: B.C. association

Doctors encourage patients to access telephone, online visits

Businesses advised to prepare for federal, B.C. COVID-19 assistance

Canada Revenue Agency portal expected to open next week

Dogs are property, not kids, B.C. judge tells former couple

Court decision made on competing lawsuits over Zeus and Aurora — a pit bull and pit bull cross

B.C. senior gives blood for 200th time, has ‘saved’ 600 lives

There was no cutting of cake for Harvey Rempel but he’s challenging youth to start donating blood

Trudeau commits $100M to help food banks amid COVID-19 crisis

Funds will help ‘urgent food needs’ for Canadians awaiting federal emergency benefits to kick in

Couple won’t self-isolate after returning from overseas: Cowichan by-law

New law requires 14 days of self-isolation when returning to Canada

How well can cell phones carry COVID-19? Disinfecting may be wise

‘You want to keep it as clean as you would normally your hands’

Most Read