Council wants to explore options beyond DCCs

City staff brought a draft bylaw of Development Cost Charges, which council discussed and was unhappy with.

City staff brought a draft bylaw of Development Cost Charges (DCC) at Monday’s Committee of Whole meeting.

The draft bylaw included five options for DCCs, which council discussed and, ultimately, was unhappy with, because the report gave little detail on other tools the city could use for charges.

DCCs are charged to developers when properties are subdivided. This allows the city to collect funding for infrastructure additions that may be needed to accommodate new development.

Coun. Kathy Moore said that in most cases DCCs are applied in fast growth areas. adding that the AECOM report that the staff used as a reference for the draft bylaw was from a time of faster growth.

“We’re not in boom times now, but we were four years ago and we may in four years hence, so we need to think about a long-term view – a longer term view than just what’s happening right now.”

Moore said that she doesn’t think bringing the DCCs up to higher levels, as suggested in the report, would work for Rossland.

“I think there may be other ways to go,” she said. “You look at the list of communities that have DCCs and there aren’t that many small towns.”

She hopes that the city can find other tools that would still allow them to collect from developers.

CAO Victor Kumar said that another option is to charge connection fees rather than DCCs. For instance, without DCCs a new developer would have to have an assessment done on how the properties would effect infrastructure downstream.

Kumar gave an example of a new developer wanting to subdivide a property into 500 lots. The developer would have to do their analysis and come back with a report.

Kumar said the city could then use Section 219 and property buyers would know that the city can charge them down the road for infrastructure costs.

“At least we have a tool that will do the job.

In that case the city would need to take out a short term loan to begin projects. The loan would be against the property.

Kumar said it’s like a parcel tax; if the city doesn’t plan ahead of time, they are instead dealing with 500 individual  property owners, instead of just the one developer.

Council have now asked that staff provide a recommendation of the combination of cross-charge tools that staff believe would best meet the needs of the community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just Posted

Nine fires burning in West Kootenay

All fires considered to be lightning caused.

West Kootenay afternoon storms spark fires

Lots of thunder and lightning, and little rain, as system moves through region

PLACE NAMES: Rossland neighbourhoods, Part 1

Early Rossland townsite built on top of mining claims

Webster students find missing man

Man reported missing from his Warfield home Wednesday night

Getting to know you better: Rossland kids spend day with nature

Third annual bio-blitz brings kids more environmental awareness

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Revamped B.C. Lions set to battle veteran Winnipeg Blue Bombers

The Lions’ first test of the season will be a big one

No business case for Trans Mountain expansion, says former environment minister

Cabinet is expected to announce its decision on the expansion of the Alberta-to-B.C. pipeline by Tuesday

Most Read