Neil Muth.

Columbia Basin Trust CEO remembered

Columbia Basin Trust board and staff, and residents of the region are mourning the unexpected passing of Neil Muth, president and CEO.

  • Nov. 15, 2016 5:00 p.m.

Columbia Basin Trust board and staff, and residents of the region join Neil’s family in mourning the unexpected passing of Neil Muth, president and CEO of CBT. Neil will be remembered for his honest and sincere engagement with communities, his leadership and his commitment to supporting the efforts of the people of the Basin.

“The trust board and staff are deeply saddened. Neil was a friend, a mentor and a leader to so many. He inspired us all to strive for excellence for the trust and the Basin,” said CBT chair Rick Jensen. “We mourn his loss and extend our deepest sympathies to his wife Cathy and three children, John, Emily and Hilary.”

“I’d like to express my sincere condolences to Neil’s wife Cathy and the children,” said Minister of Energy and Mines Bill Bennett. “As a long-time resident of the Columbia Basin and as the minister responsible for Columbia Basin Trust, I will be forever grateful for the knowledge, wisdom and vision Neil shared with me on many, many occasions. Neil has been taken from us far too soon, but his contributions to the growth of the trust and to the people of the Basin will live on forever.”

Neil joined the trust in 2005. He was born and raised in Trail, and was excited to return to the region from Victoria, where he served as vice-president, private placements, for the British Columbia Investment Management Corporation. That excitement showed in his passion for and interest in every aspect of Basin communities: their projects and their aspirations, as well as the best places to ski, eat and have a cup of coffee.

Neil’s accomplishments as president and CEO over the past 11 years are many, but his appreciation and respect for the trust’s mission statement are what truly defined his service: by ensuring the trust built and delivered programs with residents and communities; by seeking out and responding directly to feedback and guidance from communities; and by being flexible and responsive to community needs.

“While he left us much too early, we will do our best to honour Neil by continuing to work closely with communities and people just like he did,” added Jensen.

The trust board of directors will announce succession for the CEO role at a later date. In the interim, there are no changes anticipated in the trust’s day-to-day business activities.

Neil passed away peacefully at his home on Wednesday, Nov. 9. He was 57. Neil’s family will hold a private service for their beloved husband and father and will also be establishing a scholarship fund in his name. Donations can be made to CIBC account 05070/45-51311 c/o Columbia Basin Trust.

Stories, memories and messages can be sent to condolences@cbt.org or to the CBT office (300, 445 13th Ave., Castlegar, BC V1N 1G1).

 

Just Posted

$53 million for Grand Forks flood recovery

Province, feds and city each chipping in

Electric-bike project for seniors, disabled coming to Rossland

“Cycling Without Age” gets the immobile moving on special electric bikes

Council awards contract to upgrade Trail jail cells

The city received notification from the RCMP detailing modifications in 2009

Rossland’s Seven Summits Centre for Learning celebrates class of 2019

Small class packs big punch in skills and ability

Women, children escaping domestic violence have few options in Nelson

The 11th annual Report Card on Homelessness shows a need for women’s housing

VIDEO: Driver doing laps in busy Vancouver intersections nets charges

Toyota Camry spotted doing laps in intersection, driving towards pedestrians

Fundraiser for Sparwood cancer patient raises over $80k

“Friday was something I won’t ever forget,” said Sparwood’s Barry Marchi.

Former Vernon Judo coach pleads guilty to child pornography charges

Bryan Jeffrey McLachlan is set to return to court Sept. 4 for sentencing

B.C. Olympic skier sues Alpine Canada after coach’s sex offences

Bertrand Charest was convicted in 2017 on 37 charges

Case of missing Kootenay teen still unsolved 50 years later

Phillip Porter, age 16, disappeared near his home in Kimberley on June 26, 1969

Former Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo to retire

‘Bobby Lou’ calls it a career after 19 NHL seasons

Man charged in crash that killed B.C. pregnant woman

Frank Tessman charged for 2018 Highway 1 accident where Kelowna elementary school teacher died

Province unveils 10-year plan to boost mental health, addiction recovery services

The plan, called A Pathway to Hope, focuses on early-intervention services that are seeing high demand

Most Read