Bill Profili presents a different point of view on the cenotaph to council last week

Bill Profili presents a different point of view on the cenotaph to council last week

Cenotaph better to stay put, says Profili

After Alan Stinson’s strong presentation to council on April 11, former mayor Bill Profili attended the public input session of council on April 26 to offer a different vision for the cenotaph, arguing that the present location plays a key role in Rossland’s downtown core and moving it could create problems for Pioneer Park.

  • May. 4, 2011 5:00 p.m.

After Alan Stinson’s strong presentation to council on April 11, former mayor Bill Profili attended the public input session of council on April 26 to offer a different vision for the cenotaph, arguing that the present location plays a key role in Rossland’s downtown core and moving it could create problems for Pioneer Park.

“I think we need to respect [the cenotaph’s] significance in the community,” Profili said, “but I also think about how it interfaces with overall community goals, ensuring that there’s a vibrant downtown core in Rossland that’s pedestrian friendly.”

He said we were lucky to have such a “people-oriented” downtown, and should work to enhance that, instead of moving the cenotaph.

Profili suggested the city consult more closely with the legion to find alternative ways to enhance the cenotaph memorial in its present location. If council chooses to keep the cenotaph in its present location, improvements will certainly factor into the design as renovations to Washington and Columbia are planned for 2012.

The legion previously noted that “grants are available” for “upgrades” to cenotaphs and other war memorials.

Profili estimated that remodeling Pioneer Park to accommodate the cenotaph would “remove some 35 per cent of the area” from family park use and would be “putting it right where we’re encouraging kids to play.”

Council asked about the potential to purchase the vacant strip between the alley and Pioneer Park, to expand it to better serve both the cenotaph, if moved, and the park’s present functions.

“It was owned by Dr. Ozatski. The city attempted to purchase it to bring the park right to the alley,” Profili said, but the price tag was “exorbitant” and “inane.”

Profili said the cenotaph was moved to its present location beside the library in consultation with the legion and with the Ministry of Transportation.

“The compromise was that we closed a section of [Columbia] for the hour and allowed an easy diversion,” Profili told council.