Candidate profile: Laurie Charlton

Laurie Charlton is running for re-election on Rossland city council.

I’m running for Council because I care about Rossland.  I want to protect the interests of residents by ensuring things are done correctly and fairly.

During my 40 years in Rossland I’ve been continuously involved in community affairs including 17 years as Councillor and 2 years as RDKB Director.  That involvement gives me experience and knowledge about City issues which I would like to continue to use to serve our citizens.

Rossland’s biggest issue is high taxes.   Provincial statistics show Rossland with the twelfth highest per capita tax rate in 2008.  Now we’re ninth highest.  That rate will rise with the impending expenditures on the Columbia/Washington project and upgrades to the regional sewer system unless unnecessary spending is reduced.  Capital projects should be focused on upgrades of our essential services and citizens must have a direct opportunity to decide whether major projects should proceed.

Development efforts should focus on in-fill in the City core.  We need affordable housing options, particularly for seniors, that don’t include $300,000+ condos.

During the 1980’s, more development occurred in Rossland than is happening now.   Four people worked in City Hall then.  Now we have eleven.  We should cut costs by sharing services with our neighbours, such as planning, building inspection, and emergency preparedness, and eliminating duplicate services.

This area needs good paying jobs.  We must work with our neighbours to attract high value-added businesses to create those jobs.  Businesses would benefit from improved transportation into the USA.  We must continue working to create a low elevation highway to the US that will result in increased job potential in this area and a reduction in heavy truck traffic through Rossland. We should continue attracting young entrepreneurs and promote specialized medical services in the former Mater Miseracordiae hospital.

I’m a 70 years young retired Quality Assurance Manager who enjoys skiing, hiking, camping, gardening, and duplicate bridge.  I’m President of the Heritage Federation of South-Eastern BC and a member of the Columbia Kootenay Cultural Alliance.

 

 

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