An elementary school teacher in the B.C. Interior will be suspended without pay for one week in April for her treatment of Kindergarten/Grade 1 students. Monica Lamb-Yorski photo

B.C. Interior teacher suspended one week for shoving kids

A teacher from the Cariboo Chilcotin will have to take a course in creating a positive learning environment before she can return to teach

An elementary school teacher in School District 27 will serve a one-week suspension without pay after the British Columbia Commissioner for Teacher Regulation received complaints about her treatment of young students.

The disciplinary measure against Melody Anne Olga Drew will also require her to complete a course in creating a positive learning environment before she can return to teach, noted a four-paged agreement signed by Drew and the acting commissioner, Elena Miller.

Complaints against Drew, which first began in January 2015, ranged from raising her voice to reprimand students in an inappropriate manner to grabbing and forcefully moving, restraining or redirecting students.

The students were in Kindergarten/Grade 1.

This will not be Drew’s first suspension.

On April 7, 2016, the district issued a letter of discipline and suspended her for a day and recommended she undergo counselling for sensitivity training.

She was suspended without pay on Nov. 24, 2016.

On Dec. 15, 2016, the district issued another letter of discipline, and suspended her for 30 days without pay beginning Dec. 14, 2016.

According to the agreement document, Drew admits her actions constituted professional misconduct and agrees to the one-week suspension of her certificate and qualifications from April 3, 2018 to April 9, 2018.

Drew at her own expense, will have to successfully complete the creating a positive learning environment course through the Justice Institute of B.C. by April 1, 2018 or an extended deadline approved by the commissioner.

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