And then there were four

The city now has four options on the table to consider as its water mark design after it was presented with new choices.

The city now has four options on the table to consider as its water mark design after it was presented with the choices at the last regular council meeting.

At its meeting on April 22 council had previously resolved that they be presented with more alternatives to the single word mark design that had come forward for their approval.

As a result, the designer came forward with four designs for council’s approval.

However, council was divided on which design to choose from of the four, with each councillor liking aspects of each design. It was councillor Kathy Wallace that posed the question to council of the missing members—including Mayor Greg Granstrom and councillor Jill Spearn—and what value their input would be.

“I’m not sure if there is a real urgency to make a decision on this or not,” she said. “It would be nice to have all of council involved in this discussion.”

If it was obvious what the choice was around the table for the option, councillor Jody Blomme felt they should go with it.

“But because we all have our points of view, I like the idea of withdrawing the motion,” she said.

The motion to approve the city’s new watermark design was withdrawn after council wanted to give the absent members the chance to vote on the design. The decision on the watermark will be deferred to the first council meeting in June.

The word mark design is an identifying logo or stamp that would be used on the city’s website, letterhead, email signatures, truck stickers and on business cards as stock was depleted.

Part of the city-wide branding project, the other parties in the project—including Tourism Rossland, the Rossland Chamber of Commerce and the Rossland Public Library—had approved the designs as presented. But the other city groups included in the branding project had options to choose from, while council did not.

The style of the brand was made to match the new sign the city had placed at its entranceways. That entranceway design was decided upon through a public process, said Blomme. It did have a lot of involvement and was “sitting in the background” before it came out.

At its Feb. 12 meeting council had passed a motion to move forward with the city’s individual branding project using the grant money provided by Tourism Rossland from Kootenay Rockies Tourism Community Opportunities Fund.

The board of Tourism Rossland felt that the continued consistency of look, feel and colours was to “everyone’s advantage.”

New business cards would cost $710 for 10 boxes, while 22 new truck decals would be $407, costing the City $1,117 to change the design.

But the only immediate cost would be a change out to the vehicles, said Tracey Butler, city corporate officer.

“So the actual costs are minimal because we don’t get letterhead printed, we just change it electronically,” she said.

editor@rosslandnews.com

 

 

 

 

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