5 nations want Iran to deliver justice on downed plane

FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2020 file photo, debris litters the scene where a Ukrainian plane crashed in Shahedshahr southwest of the capital Tehran, Iran. More questions than answers remain about the disaster that killed 176 people on board the Ukrainian jetliner, a year after Iran’s military mistakenly downed the plane with surface-to-air missiles. Officials in Canada, which was home to many of the passengers on the doomed plane, and other affected countries have raised concerns about the lack of transparency and accountability in Iran’s investigation of its own military. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2020 file photo, an airport employee looks at a makeshift memorial for the flight crew of the Ukrainian 737-800 plane that crashed on the outskirts of Tehran, inside Borispil International Airport, Kyiv, Ukraine. More questions than answers remain about the disaster that killed 176 people on board the Ukrainian jetliner, a year after Iran’s military mistakenly downed the plane with surface-to-air missiles. Officials in Canada, which was home to many of the passengers on the doomed plane, and other affected countries have raised concerns about the lack of transparency and accountability in Iran’s investigation of its own military. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2020 file photo, Babak Razzaghi, right, consoles his sister Banafsheh Razzaghi as they mourn the loss of their sister Niloofar Razzaghi, brother-in-law Ardalan Hamidi and nephew Kamyar Hamidi, who died in a Ukraine airplane crash in Iran on Jan. 8, 2020, during a vigil, at the Har El synagogue in West Vancouver, British Columbia. More questions than answers remain about the disaster that killed 176 people on board the Ukrainian jetliner, a year after Iran’s military mistakenly downed the plane with surface-to-air missiles. Officials in Canada, which was home to many of the passengers on the doomed plane, and other affected countries have raised concerns about the lack of transparency and accountability in Iran’s investigation of its own military. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

The countries whose citizens were killed when Iran accidentally shot down a Ukrainian jetliner said Friday they want Iran “to deliver justice and make sure Iran makes full reparations to the families of the victims and affected countries.”

In a joint statement marking the one-year anniversary of the Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 crash, Ukraine, Canada, Britain, Afghanistan and Sweden said they want Tehran “to provide a complete and thorough explanation of the events and decisions that led to this appalling plane crash.”

Sweden earlier had said that Iran had agreed to compensate the families’ of the foreign victims.

The shootdown by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard happened the same night Iran launched a ballistic missile attack targeting U.S. soldiers in Iraq, its response to the American drone strike that killed Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad on Jan. 3.

The plane was en route to the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv. The victims included 57 Canadian citizens as well as 11 Ukrainians, 17 people from Sweden, four Afghans and four British citizens. Those from Sweden included both Swedish nationals and people with staying permits in the Scandinavian country.

At first, Iran had denied its involvement in the plane crash but then announced that its military had mistakenly and unintentionally shot down the Ukrainian jetliner.

The statement was signed by ministers of Afghanistan, Canada, Sweden, Ukraine and United Kingdom.

The Associated Press

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