A red ticket on the window marks the vehicles that ICBC has written off because of acid exposure. Those vehicles line the side of the Trail ICBC office located on Highway Drive in Glenmerry. (Sheri Regnier photo)

A red ticket on the window marks the vehicles that ICBC has written off because of acid exposure. Those vehicles line the side of the Trail ICBC office located on Highway Drive in Glenmerry. (Sheri Regnier photo)

400 vehicles written off from Trail acid spills

ICBC says it will sue parties responsible in “due course”

With 400 cars junked because of the Trail acid spills – and counting – ICBC says it’s gearing up for a lawsuit.

Related story here: Claims skyrocket after acid spill

Related story here: Cars junked after acid spill

Related story here: Trail acid spill

At this point, however, the B.C. insurer is not naming names.

“This work has already begun,” ICBC spokesperson Lindsey Wilkins told the Trail Times. “ICBC is in the process of determining who is at fault and will sue those parties in due course.”

The volume of claims resulting from the two acid spills in Trail and the subsequent cost are significant, she said.

“It’s important to first note that ICBC will be trying to recover the costs incurred from the people responsible for the spills.”

The overall volume of claims now exceeds 3,500.

“These two spills have led to some of the largest claims losses we have ever experienced,” Wilkins said. “In terms of volume and cost from just two events.”

But it’s important to note, many residents are reporting a claim as a precautionary measure.

And there is a growing trend of vehicles that have not been exposed to acid.

“We’ve inspected approximately 1,700 vehicles so far,” she clarified. “And have deemed over 1,300 with no evidence of exposure or damage from the acid spills – and this number continues to increase on a daily basis.”

Up to 100 vehicles are being inspected daily with additional claims staff and other initiatives now put into place at the ICBC office, located on Highway Drive.

“These numbers speak to how thorough we are being in estimating each vehicle,” Wilkins said. “This due diligence speaks to why these claims will continue to take time to review to ensure we are making the correct decision on each vehicle and for each of our customers.”

Infographics have been distributed throughout the community, including MLA Katrine Conroy’s office, numerous repair shops and broker offices, Service BC on Eldorado Street in downtown Trail, and the City of Trail.

For more information, visit icbc.com/Trail.

The first spill occurred the morning of April 10. In that incident, leaks began from Teck Trail and extended the 16-kilometre (km) run from the plant, through town, and out to the Waneta re-load station. The May 23 spill stretched approximately five-km along Highway 3B.

 

Vehicles that have not been exposed to acid receive written confirmation from ICBC.

Vehicles that have not been exposed to acid receive written confirmation from ICBC.