The Black Press Extreme Education & Career Fair will showcase a full array of career and education opportunities at the Bay Street Armoury Oct. 25.

The Black Press Extreme Education & Career Fair will showcase a full array of career and education opportunities at the Bay Street Armoury Oct. 25.

5 reasons your career search just got easier

Black Press Education and Career Fair comes to the Kootenays

If you’re in the market for a job change, or are charting your education path with an eye to a future career, you’re in luck: Black Press brings you a career fair to Cranbrook’s Ktunaxa Nation Building.

From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 15, the Black Press Extreme Education & Career Fair will showcase a full array of career and education opportunities.

“The number and diversity of participating organizations speaks to the necessity of Career Fairs in today’s job market space and Black Press is happy to host an event that matches job seekers with employers,” says Sheri Jackson, Black Press News Media Group’s events manager.

“We really bring together so much opportunity under one roof – when it comes time to seek employment or education, people can see so many options in one place,” Jackson says. “We also have a wide range of employers ready to hire, and they find it a valuable opportunity to meet potential employees who would be a great fit for their workplace.”

1. So much to explore: One of eight Black Press career fairs hosted around the province, from Vancouver Island to the Kootenays, discover more than 30 booths filled with representatives from Walmart, Real Canadian Superstore and Canadian Armed Forces, plus post-secondary institutions such as College of the Rockies, and so much more!

2. So much to learn: A career fair is an educational experience all on its own. On-the-spot interviews and filling out applications all while honing your people skills while speaking directly with the employers looking to hire.

3. Building connections: In a province with an already low unemployment rate, B.C.’s Labour Market Outlook anticipates more than 900,000 job openings over the next decade, three-quarters of which will require some post-secondary education or training. With education and employers together under one roof, prospective job-seekers will find the resources they need to make their career dreams a reality.

4. Employer resources: With those kind of numbers, the Black Press career fairs are just as vital for employers – a place they can focus on the potential job seekers, see how many people are searching for employment in their field, and conduct on-the-spot interviews.

5. It’s free! The education and career fair is free and open to the public, with ample parking onsite.

Learn more about the Black Press Extreme Education and Career fair at the Facebook event page, email localwork@blackpress.ca or call 1-855-678-7833.

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