Sunshine at Rossland’s market trumps location

Despite being moved from its previous location, Rossland's market is doing just fine.

The Rossland Mountain Market hasn’t been hindered by its new location.

The Columbia Avenue and Washington Street revitalization project forced the farmer’s market out of the location that it has been held in for the last three years, but moving up one block has had no impact on the turnout this year.

Many people in the community sought reprieve from the downtown construction project, so they came out to relax and mingle in the sunshine.

Roughly 20 vendors wedge a series of colourful tents between the old fire hall and St. Andrew’s United Church to sell arts and crafts, flowers, baking, fruits, vegetables, plants and preserves every Thursday. The market serves the community by providing a unique place for locals to hangout and shop.

“In a nutshell, we do have larger vendors that come from afar, but it’s the local vendors and artisans right here in Rossland that are the cornerstone of the market,” said Rachael Roussin, the event organizer. “People seem to come for the food, but we also have a lot of burgeoning local entrepreneurs.”

The market sells everything from plum dipping sauce to baking, homemade vinegars, cupcakes and more. Farmers from the Crescent Valley, Creston, Crawford Bay and Castlegar have registered this year, but each week the vendors vary.

“It ranges throughout the season. We don’t have the exact same vendors the same weeks the whole season—it ebbs and flows depending on who is in town,” Roussin said. “But it’s usually between 14 and 28 vendors.”

More than 300 people attended the sunny market on Queen Street and First Avenue last Thursday. It will continue running from 3-6 p.m. each Thursday until Thanksgiving weekend with the simple rule of “make it, bake it or grow it.”

Other highlights of the market this year include artisan vendors selling original pieces of artwork—like felt hats, earrings or baby clothes—and live music.

For more information about the market visit www.rosslandfood.com or reserve a spot by e-mail at rossmountainmarket@yahoo.ca

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