Rossland residents to unite in April for Daffodil Month

For Canadian Cancer Society, the daffodil is more than a simple flower

This bright and hopeful symbol shows people living with cancer that they don’t have to face cancer alone, and that we won’t give up until we have achieved our vision of a world where no Canadian fears cancer.

During April — Daffodil Month — the Canadian Cancer Society asks all Canadians to buy a daffodil pin and wear it to show their support for those living with cancer.

“We celebrate the ‘power of the flower’ all year round but April is really our time to shine!” says Lynnette Wray, financial support program team lead for the Canadian Cancer Society in the southern interior. “When loved ones are diagnosed with cancer, we often want to do something to help or honour them. This April, we want people to know that there is something they can do.”

Rossland residents can support Canadians living with cancer by wearing a pin, buying fresh cut flowers and donating to the door-to-door campaign. Every donation made during the Canadian Cancer Society’s April Daffodil Campaign brings us one step closer to preventing cancer, detecting it earlier, improving treatment and helping Canadians live longer, healthier lives.

Last year, the Canadian Cancer Society was able to fund $45 million dollars in world-class research to fight all cancers and help more than 85,000 Canadians through its information and support services. The society also funds important cancer prevention work so fewer Canadians are diagnosed in the first place.

“In April we like to focus on the support programs that help people on a cancer journey,” says Wray. “Like our Lodge in Kelowna where patients can stay during cancer treatments to the financial support program that helps pay for their travel expenses to get there. We also have a wig bank in our Trail office where people can come and borrow a wig and get the emotional support they need.”

Of the five regions in the BC/Yukon division of the Canadian Cancer Society, the southern interior is the largest user of the financial support program. Since September 2010, over 1,500 clients have been approved for a total of over $700,000 in funding.

“Our region is the biggest user of the financial support program for several reasons,” explains Wray. “We’re very geographically dispersed and patients often have to travel long distances for cancer treatment in Kelowna or Vancouver. For example, a patient in Cranbrook might need specialized treatment that they can only get in Vancouver. That’s 958 km with limited low-cost transportation options and barriers such as mountain passes and winter weather.”

“I’m proud to be a part of the Canadian Cancer Society because I think with the help of our amazing volunteers and generous donors we’re making a real difference in the lives of people on their cancer journey,” says Wray.

In Rossland, the Canadian Cancer Society kicks off Daffodil Month by selling fresh cut daffodils at Ferraro Foods on March 26 and 27. The daffodil pin will be available by donation at various businesses in Rossland and Trail throughout April, including Kootenay Savings Credit Union, Ferraro Foods and BC Liquor stores.

“We’re looking forward to another successful daffodil campaign,” says Wray. “I want to thank everybody that buys a pin, or a bunch of daffodils, or donates at the door. Thank you for making a difference.”

in the lives of cancer patients and their families.”

 

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