PLACE NAMES: Oasis and Oatescott

Oasis, just north of Trail, was originally called Crockettville after Harrison (Shorty) Crockett (1903-90) and his wife Kathleen (Kate).

Crockettville Service is seen in the 1940s. From far left

One hundred forty-first in an alphabetical series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names

Oasis, just north of Trail, was originally called Crockettville after Harrison (Shorty) Crockett (1903-90) and his wife Kathleen (Kate).

According to Trail of Memories, the couple “rented the Old Doc Perdue orchard, across the highway from what is now known as Rivervale … In 1938, after living at the Perdue place for about four years, Harry built a house and store … They sold gas, oil, confections, and food: bulk sugar, flour, and canned goods. He built a two-bay garage where he repaired and painted vehicles.”

The store was going to be called Morning Glory Service, but instead became Crockettville Service.

In A Trail to Remember, Harry and Kate’s son Walter writes: “How it came to be I don’t know, but the Trail Times staff marked the outside wrapper with ‘Crockettville.’ I was told that when the Castlegar Transportation Society cars were going to work on afternoon and night shift, the men riding the car from Castlegar would remind the driver ‘Don’t forget to pick up the guys at Crockettville.’”

The earliest known mention of Crockettville is in the August 1942 issue of Cominco Magazine: “Harry Crockett, diminutive but energetic ‘Mayor of Crockettville’ and the residents who pitched in and helped, certainly do deserve a big hand for the work they have done in the little community four miles along the Castlegar road from Trail … [T]he entire community boasts a population of only about 35 men, 35 women, and 70 kids.”

The Crocketts sold their business to Len Bond in 1944. When a post office opened on Sept. 16, 1946, it was called Oasis. An early newspaper mention appeared in the Trail Daily Times on Oct. 18 of that year: “A car driven by Leslie Richard Hilts was badly damaged when it overturned on the wrong side of the highway just north of Oasis (Crocketville) at approximately 10:45 last night.”

In the Oct. 24, 1970 edition of Star Weekly, resident Albert Donaldson observed: “I don’t know why they ever chose [the name]. You’d expect to find palm trees or something, but there’s nothing like that around here.”

So where did it come from? Trail of Memories notes Harry Crockett “would thaw water pipes that led from the house to a spring up the mountain side. Nine times out of ten, water had to be packed from a spring along the highway just below the Green family estate.”

The spring 2004 edition of the Trail Journal of Local History says land surveyor John D. Anderson “named his property here Little Oasis. In the mid-1940s this name was adopted by the post office. ‘Little’ was subsequently dropped.”

The post office closed in 1970.

Oatescott

This place, north of Needles on the west side of Lower Arrow Lake, was formerly known as Christie’s Landing and Lascelles Landing.

According to Whistle Stops Along the Columbia Narrows, it was originally named after Alex Christian, or Christie (1873-1924), a prominent Sinixt man whose family lived at what’s now Brilliant. Christie sold his land to William James Lascelles (1858-1921), a brother to the Earl of Harewood and an Indian army veteran.

Christie’s Landing and Lascelles Landing were apparently interchangeable, for the Nelson Daily News of Aug. 28, 1913 noted: “W.J. Lascelles of Lascelles Landing spent a few hours in town last night” but on Oct. 14 of the same year: “Mr. Lassells [sic] of Christie’s Landing is spending a few days in town.”

Sometime before 1918 Lascelles renamed his property Oatescott (also spelled Oatscott) in honour of two members of an ill-fated Antarctic expedition, Capt. L.E.G. (Titus) Oates (1880-1912) and Capt. Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912). Oates, suffering from frostbite, walked into a blizzard to face certain death so his companions might live, although his sacrifice was unsuccessful. Scott died days later.

Oatescott is first mentioned as a steamer landing in the 1918 Wrigley’s directory for BC.

Capt. Oates is also remembered in Mount Oates, on the BC-Alberta boundary in Hambler Provincial Park.

The Arrow Lakes Indian Reserve, established in 1902, was later known as the Oatscott Reserve. After the last registered band member on the reserve died in 1953, the Canadian government declared the tribe extinct, although over 250 members lived in the US.

Today the only thing left at Oatescott is a grave marker which remembers 15 members of the band buried there (pictured below).

Eileen Delehanty Pearkes photo

Previous installments in this series

Introduction

Ainsworth

Alamo

Anaconda

Annable, Apex, and Arrow Park

Annable, revisited

Appledale

Applegrove, Appleby, and Appledale revisited

Argenta and Arrowhead

Aylwin

Bakers, Birds, and Bosun Landing

Balfour

Bannock City, Basin City, and Bear Lake City

Beasley

Beaton

Bealby Point

Bealby Point (aka Florence Park) revisited

Belford and Blewett

Beaverdell and Billings

Birchbank and Birchdale

Blueberry and Bonnington

Boswell, Bosworth, Boulder Mill, and Broadwater

Brandon

Brilliant

Brooklyn, Brouse, and Burnt Flat

Burton

Camborne, Cariboo City, and Carrolls Landing

Carmi, Cedar Point, Circle City, and Clark’s Camp

Carson, Carstens, and Cascade City

Casino and Champion Creek

Castlegar, Part 1

Castlegar, Part 2

Castlegar, Part 3

Christina Lake

Christina City and Christian Valley

Clubb Landing and Coltern

Cody and Champion Creek revisited

Champion Creek revisited, again

Columbia

Columbia City, Columbia Gardens, and Columbia Park

Comaplix

Cooper Creek and Corra Linn

Crawford Bay and Comaplix revisited

Crescent Valley and Craigtown

Davenport

Dawson, Deadwood, and Deanshaven

Deer Park

East Arrow Park and Edgewood

Eholt

English Cove and English Point

Enterprise

Erie

Evans Creek and Evansport

Falls City

Farron

Fauquier

Ferguson

Ferguson, revisited

Fife

Forslund, Fosthall, and Fairview

Fort Shepherd vs. Fort Sheppard, Part 1

Fort Shepherd vs. Fort Sheppard, Part 2

Fort Sheppard, revisited

Fraser’s Landing and Franklin

Fredericton

Fruitvale and Fraine

Galena Bay

Genelle

Gerrard

Gilpin and Glade

Gladstone and Gerrard, revisited

Glendevon and Graham Landing

Gloster City

Goldfields and Gold Hill

Grand Forks, Part 1

Grand Forks, Part 2

Granite Siding and Granite City

Gray Creek, Part 1

Gray Creek, Part 2

Gray Creek, revisited

Green City

Greenwood

Halcyon Hot Springs

Hall Siding and Healy’s Landing

Harrop

Hartford Junction

Hills

Howser, Part 1

Howser, Part 2

Howser, Part 3

Howser, Part 4

Hudu Valley, Huntingtdon, and Healy’s Landing revisited

Inonoaklin Valley (aka Fire Valley)

Jersey, Johnsons Landing, and Jubilee Point

Kaslo, Part 1

Kaslo, Part 2

Kaslo, Part 3

Kaslo, Part 4

Kettle River, Part 1

Kettle River, Part 2

Kinnaird, Part 1

Kinnaird, Part 2

Kitto Landing

Koch Siding and Keen

Kokanee

Kootenay Bay, Kraft, and Krestova

Kuskonook, Part 1

Kuskonook, Part 2

Kuskonook (and Kuskanax), Part 3

Labarthe, Lafferty, and Longbeach

Lardeau, Part 1

Lardeau, Part 2

Lardeau, Part 3

Lardeau, Part 4

Lebahdo

Lemon Creek, Part 1

Lemon Creek, Part 2

Lemon Creek, Part 3

Makinsons Landing and Marblehead

McDonalds Landing, McGuigan, and Meadow Creek

Meadows, Melville, and Miles’ Ferry

Midway

Mineral City and Minton

Mirror Lake and Molly Gibson Landing

Montgomery and Monte Carlo, Part 1

Montgomery and Monte Carlo, Part 2

Montrose and Myncaster

Nakusp, Part 1

Nakusp, Part 2

Nashville

Needles

Nelson, Part 1

Nelson, Part 2

Nelson, Part 3

Nelson, Part 4

Nelson, Wash.

Nelway and New Galway

New Denver, Part 1

New Denver, Part 2

Niagara

Just Posted

Columbia River Treaty to be renegotiated in early 2018

News came in a Tweet from the U.S. Department of State

Man who pledged to give B.C. hockey team millions charged with fraud

Mike Gould has since repaid $8,000 he allegedly owed Cranbrook restaurant, owner says

Site C dam goes ahead, cost estimate now up to $10.7 billion

Premier John Horgan says Christy Clark left him no other choice

L’école des Sept-sommets in Rossland receives funding for water upgrade

L’École des Sept-sommets is one of six B.C. schools that will soon have access to healthier water.

No commercial room to let in downtown Rossland

There are no “for rent” signs posted in Rossland’s downtown.

Me Too At Work: Sexual assault and harassment in the B.C. workplace

Introducing an in-depth look at who is affected and what can be done

Canadians lag behind Americans in giving to charity

Only one-in-five Canadians donated to charities in 2017

B.C. children adoption rates lagging, despite increased funding: watchdog

More than 1,000 children children are still waiting to be adopted, new report shows

FortisBC to lower natural gas rates in 2018

Rate changes to impact the Lower Mainland, Kootenays, Interior and Vancouver Island

Four-month-old baby girl critically injured in Toronto

Baby, a man and a woman in serious condition

Google searches suggest 2017 a tough year

What were Canadians were curious about: Google searches suggest 2017 a tough year

Democrat wins stunning red-state Alabama Senate upset

Democrat Doug Jones wins stunning red-state Alabama Senate upset against Roy Moore

Horgan says pot smokers may face same outdoor rules as cigarette smokers

B.C. is developing its rules on recreational marijuana

Truck driver volunteers to take dog lost in B.C. back home to Alberta

Frankie, a pit bull service dog, was found wandering in the Lower Mainland

Most Read