Southeast Fire Centre urges Rosslanders caution with open burning

As the snow melts in Rossland, dried grass from last summer gets uncovered and that material can be highly flammable.

The Southeast Fire Centre is asking the Rosslanders and those in Area B around the city to exercise caution while conducting any outdoor burning activities this spring.

As the snow melts, dried grass from last summer gets uncovered and that material can be highly flammable. Almost all wildfires at this time of the year are caused by people and are therefore preventable.

Homeowners in Rossland and industry personnel are encouraged to consult the B.C. FireSmart manual, visit the Wildfire Management Branch website: www.bcwildfire.ca – and take the following precautions:

• Ensure that enough people, water and tools are on hand to control the fire and prevent it from escaping.

• Do not burn during windy conditions. Weather conditions can change quickly and the wind may carry embers to other combustible material and start new fires.

• Create a fireguard at least one metre around the planned fire site by clearing away twigs, grass, leaves and other combustible material.

• If you are planning a large burn, consider conducting smaller burns around the perimeter beforehand to create a fuel break and help stop the fire from spreading beyond its intended size. Each of these fires should be kept small and must be completely extinguished before starting a new fire.

• Never leave a fire unattended and make sure that your fire is completely extinguished and the ashes are cold to the touch before you leave the area.

If you are planning to do any large-scale industrial burning or conduct a grass burn over 0.2 hectares (Category 3 fires), you must obtain a burn registration number ahead of time by calling 1 888 797-1717.

Venting conditions should always be checked before conducting an open burn. If conditions are rated “Poor” or “Fair”, open burning is restricted. The venting index can be found at: http://www.bcairquality.ca/readings/ventilation-index.html

In British Columbia, the Wildfire Act specifies a person’s legal obligations when using fire on or within one kilometre of forest land or grassland. If an outdoor burn escapes and causes a wildfire, the person responsible may be held accountable for damages and fire suppression costs.

Anyone found in contravention of an open fire prohibition may be issued a ticket for $345 or, if convicted in court, may be fined up to $100,000 and sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person may be subject to a penalty of up to $10,000 and be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.

The Province thanks the public for its continued help in preventing wildfires. If you see flames or smoke, call 1 800 663-5555 toll-free or dial *5555 on your cellphone.

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