Opinion

July 1912: Scarlet fever sweeps through Rossland

Compiled by the Rossland Historical Museum from the pages of the Rossland Miner.  Please fill out the Rossland Museum Survey, available at the Museum or online at www.rosslandmuseum.ca

100 Years Ago

July 1912

NOTICE: In order to prevent a further spread of scarlet fever the attendance of children, under the age of 15 years, is hereby prohibited at Sunday schools, moving picture shows or other public gatherings until further notice.

About Town

Father MacIntyre has been appointed by the Bishop of the diocese to be in charge of the Sacred Heart church, and he has arrived and taken charge.  He is a young priest who was ordained a short time since at Denver, Col., where he spent the last year of his studies.  He is a native of Nova Scotia, is a young man of much ability and will make a successful pastor.

***

The hills are full of huckleberry pickers, and they return to town with full baskets and pots of the splendid fruit. One party of three, returned with 50 pounds of the berries, and a single individual picked four gallons in about four hours.  There never was a season when there were more berries nor finer ones that the present.

The picking of the berries, however, is marred by boys armed with small calibre rifles, who shoot at anything from sparrow to humming bird, without minding who may be in the way.

A party who were out on Sunday had several narrow escapes from being shot by bullets which seemed to be coming from many different directions.

Pole Broke on Hose Wagon and it Crashes Through Plate Glass Window

While the Rossland hose team was practising, the fastenings to the pole broke and the wagon swerved to one side and raced in towards the sidewalk.

The curb was crowded with interested spectators, and among these was Dr. Coffin.

The doctor was right in the way of the hose wagon and he endeavored to elude it and prevent himself from being run over.

He escaped by a hair’s breadth, for the wheel of the vehicle took the medical satchel that he carried out of his hand.

The wagon kept on its course and crashed through the window of the Clarendon, breaking the plate glass window into fragments and inflicting damage to the extend of about $50.

75 Years Ago

July 1937

Jack Killough, who is stationed on Old Glory at the forestry lookout station had a close call, when a bolt of lightning struck within a few feet of where he was standing.  He was taking the lid off the stove when the lightning struck, and he received a severe shock.

It is learned that thunder storms have been particularly severe on Old Glory this year, with the lightning striking all around the cabin.

***

One and a half miles of city streets will be hard-surfaced within the next few weeks if the property owners give their assent to the prescribed plans in the $11,000 bylaw to be voted on.

From every quarter there has come approval of the plan as outlined... perhaps the greatest contributing factor to the success of the street-surfacing idea is the present state of the city streets.

Dust, pot-holes, loose gravel, and other unpleasant conditions exist to a point where something must be done.

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