Council hopes Rossland can rejoin district’s Regional Emergency Preparedness Service

Rossland city council wants to rejoin Regional Emergency Preparedness Service, but won't pay a full year's fees for 2016.

Monday, city council voted against a motion to rejoin the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary’s (RDKB) Regional Emergency Preparedness Service. The motion that was before council required that Rossland pay $23,052, or a full year’s service fees, for 2016 and pay its share of capital investments made since 2008, when Rossland opted out of the service. Rossland’s share of the capital investments would be $18,880.

Council ultimately felt it was unreasonable for the district to require the City of Rossland to pay a full year’s service fees for half a year’s service, though mayor and councillors were generally in favour of rejoining the Regional Emergency Preparedness Service, as it would ensure better service for Rosslanders at a comparable price to what the city is currently spending on its own emergency preparedness. The city has currently budgeted $26,944 for its emergency services program in 2016 and has a $1,850 annual contract with the Canadian Red Cross for the provision of basics needs for victims of disaster.

Council then asked Councillor Lloyd McLellan, liaison to the district, to take a request back to the RDKB that Rossland rejoin the service, but pay only for the capital investments and the service the city would receive in 2016. Otherwise the city would rejoin at the beginning of 2017.

City renews agreements with Tourism Rossland, YAN

Council voted to renew the City of Rossland’s contracts with Tourism Rossland and the Rossland Youth Action Network. The city has a general service agreement with Tourism Rossland to operate as the destination management organization for the city, promoting local businesses and developing tourism. Council also voted to consider future options for a multi-year agreement with Tourism Rossland and to share any potential changes to the agreement with key stakeholders for feedback.

Council renewed its contract with Ripple Effects Consulting, which provides a coordinator for the Rossland Youth Action Network (YAN). The contract for coordinator wages and program expenses increased from $25,000 to $55,000 in keeping with an expected increase in funding from the Columbia Basin Trust, which funds the program.

Council votes for compromise between Lions Campground and Centennial Wetland

A conflict arose between the expansion of the Lions Campground and the Centennial Wetland restoration project. The Lions wanted to expand the campground with two additional serviced campsites, but would be encroaching into the wetland. City staff proposed a compromise wherein the Lions can put in a 6-meter wide campsite parallel to the road, which should not impact the wetland project, and council approved the recommendation.

City enforcing wildlife safety

The city issued a fine to a resident who left garbage beside a dumpster instead of in it. After nine bears were killed last year, the City of Rossland has decided to crack down on those who leave out attractants.

Water consumption up in May

The city’s water consumption increased to 65,675 cubic meters in May from 50,246 cubic meters in April, according to a public works update.

High: 2,601cubic meters on May 18

Low: 1,724 cubic meters on May 25

Summer reading at Rossland Library

Beverly Rintoul, director of the Rossland Public Library, invited the mayor and councillors to participate in the summer reading club at the library and asked them to share their reading via social media. She also introduced Lindsay Crispin, the summer reading club coordinator.